The Picnic Beetle

Sap beetles feed on sap: sap oozing from trees, sap oozing from plants damaged by other insects and occasionally are found living with bees. One of the sap beeltes,Glischrochilus fasciatus, is called the picnic beetle, because it is attracted to odors of fruit juices, wine, beer and other fermenting beverages. Thus, they are commonly found at picnics. Picnic beetles are not good drinkers. They are commonly found drowning their sorrows in beverage cups, making drinking more difficult for the humans.

The picnic beetles live as larvae in decayed and fermenting plant material. In late summer and fall, large numbers can invade picnic grounds and dimish the outdoor dining pleasure. Picnic beetles overwinter as adults and emerge in early spring. Picnic beetles are usually secondary pests of fruits and corn. They invade sites that have been damaged by other insects. They can carry fungal spores that promote spoilage of the fruit

This beetle was attracted to the sap of a recently cut maple trees, just as the sap started to run, one warm day in spring.

Picnic Beetle, Glischrochilus fasciatus

About jjneal

Jonathan Neal is an Associate Professor of Entomology at Purdue University and author of the textbook, Living With Insects (2010). This blog is a forum to communicate about the intersection of insects with people and policy. This is a personal blog. The opinions and materials posted here are those of the author and are in no way connected with those of my employer.
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1 Response to The Picnic Beetle

  1. Jessica Tonkin says:

    How do I keep them from coming on my body?????????

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