Insect Odor Detector / Bedbugs

A few months ago, I posted about Roscoe, the bed bug sniffing dog who has his own Facebook page. Move over Roscoe, there is a new detector in town, tiny wasps. A couple weeks ago, I posted about using wasps for detection of important odors. The wasp-based odor detection technology also works to detect bed bugs.

Georgia scientists Glen Rains and Joe Lewis have demonstrated that their Wasp Hound technology can detect bed bug infestations. The current device consists of a fan that pushes air into a chamber. A cartridge containing 5 trained wasps can be inserted into the chamber. When the target odor is present, the wasps will respond with characteristic movements. A camera in the device captures the wasp response and the movement analyzed. It requires about 20 seconds to get a response.

A convenient method of quickly detecting bed bugs would be helpful in controlling bed bug infestations in large buildings such as hotels or apartments. The better the detection, the better the control. Early detection could allow control to begin before an infestation is established and spread throughout the building.

Underside of immature bed bug

About jjneal

Jonathan Neal is an Associate Professor of Entomology at Purdue University and author of the textbook, Living With Insects (2010). This blog is a forum to communicate about the intersection of insects with people and policy. This is a personal blog. The opinions and materials posted here are those of the author and are in no way connected with those of my employer.
This entry was posted in Bed Bugs, Biomaterials, Pest Management. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Insect Odor Detector / Bedbugs

  1. Pingback: Living With Bed Bugs | Living With Insects Blog

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