Beetle Check

Asian LongHorned Beetle

Asian LongHorned Beetle
Image: Donald Duerr, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Invasive species move into a state most frequently from a neighboring state.  It follows that the highest risk for invasion comes from large populations of an invasive near the border.  The Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) can be found in the Cincinnati area, a few miles from the Indiana border. Governor Pence is asking Indiana residents to check for signs of the beetle.

How can you help? Asian Longhorned Beetles are wobbly fliers that sometimes land in swimming pools and become trapped in the filters. Swimming pool owners or managers can check the filters and report any large beetles that look like ALB to the state. The ALB prefers maples. Homeowners can check maple tress for large exit holes or burrows. (The little holes in rows are made by sap suckers. They are not ALB). If a hole is suspicious, collect the frass. It can be analyzed for ALB DNA. Previously healthy maples that show signs of decline are worrisome and should be inspected.

If ALB is found, your tree will be removed. The tree will not have long to live and their is no good treatment. Don’t move untreated hardwood firewood in the Cincinnati area. Beetles can be hiding in the wood and moved to a new area. The beetle is often found in the tops of trees, making inspections difficult. Until better monitoring methods are developed the best defense against ALB is an informed and alert public.

About jjneal

Jonathan Neal is a retired Associate Professor of Entomology at Purdue University and author of the textbook, Living With Insects (2010). This blog is a forum to communicate about the intersection of insects with people and policy. This is a personal blog. The opinions and materials posted here are those of the author and are in no way connected with those of my employer.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s