Living With Insects In the Home

A wide range of arthropod species will invade western style homes generating many complaints from homeowners and fueling a lucrative pest control industry. A group of scientists documented the arthropod species found in North Carolina homes and found a range of 32- 211 species per house. Not surprising, the species were dominated by Diptera (flies), spiders beetles, bees wasps and ants. Together, these account for 3/4 of the species. These arthropod groups have the greatest number of species and are well represented in overall numbers. Under represented are Lepidoptera, which comprise only 2% of the species in homes but about 15 percent of arthropod species. Cockroaches are a small fraction of the arthropod species and the number of species frequently found indoors in the US is less than a dozen species, yet the contribute 2 percent of the total. Altogether, the highly visible species should not surprise too many homeowners, but the more critic often escape detection.

Indoor Arthropods

Indoor Arthropods
From: DOI: 10.7717/peerj.1582/fig-5

Bertone MA, Leong M, Bayless KM, Malow TLF, Dunn RR, Trautwein MD. (2016) Arthropods of the great indoors: characterizing diversity inside urban and suburban homes. PeerJ 4:e1582 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.1582

About jjneal

Jonathan Neal is an Associate Professor of Entomology at Purdue University and author of the textbook, Living With Insects (2010). This blog is a forum to communicate about the intersection of insects with people and policy. This is a personal blog. The opinions and materials posted here are those of the author and are in no way connected with those of my employer.
This entry was posted in by jjneal, Environment, Taxonomy. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Living With Insects In the Home

  1. Pingback: Living With Insects In the Home – Entomo Planet

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