Living With Leishmaniasis

Sand Fly

Sand Fly Photo:

Visceral leishmaniasis is transmitted by biting phlebotomine flies (aka sand flies). The disease is spreading to urban areas in parts of Brazil.  Leishmaniasis is a neglected disease in countries such as Brazil because the disease mostly affects poor people with limited access to health care professionals.

The primary agent that causes visceral leishmaniasis, Leishmania infantum, can infect dogs. Infected dogs may be asymptomatic and therefore go untreated. A fly that bites an infected dog can transmit the disease to a nearby human.  This makes dogs ownership a risk factor for the disease.

Leishmaniasis can be cured with antibiotics. If left untreated, it can cause severe medical problems that are potentially lethal.  Prevention efforts typically focus on 2 points in the transmission cycle. The first first is to reduce the population of phlebotomine flies. The second is the use of personal insect repellents to prevent the flies from biting people. People with dogs that go into areas with uncontrolled sand flies should take extra precautions to prevent phlebotomine fly bites.

About jjneal

Jonathan Neal is an Associate Professor of Entomology at Purdue University and author of the textbook, Living With Insects (2010). This blog is a forum to communicate about the intersection of insects with people and policy. This is a personal blog. The opinions and materials posted here are those of the author and are in no way connected with those of my employer.
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One Response to Living With Leishmaniasis

  1. Pingback: Living With Leishmaniasis – Entomo Planet

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