Robert Evans Snodgrass

Snodgrass Illustration

R.E. Snodgrass Illustration*

R.E. Snodgrass is familiar to most entomologists as the author of The Principles of Insect Morphology. Snodgrass was interested in biology at a young age and practiced taxodermy on birds. His family sent him to a religious prep school where he studied drawing. The school forbade the teaching of evolution and biology was not taught. The rebel, Snodgrass, read Darwin, Huxley and Spenser which led to arguments with his parents and a personna non grata in the local church.

As a student at Stanford, Snodgrass was bitten by the “entomology bug” in his studies of the Mallophaga (biting lice) under VL Kellogg. His illustration abilities helped him in his studies of Mallophaga mouthparts. His illustrations were detailed, accurate and were important to making the case for the close relationship between Mallophaga and bark lice. He wrote chapters in Kellogg’s monographs about Mallophaga and in 1905 published the results of his comparative morphology studies on Mallophaga and Corrodentia (=Psocoptera). Those who have studied from his The Principles of Insect Morphology will recognize his penchant for abbreviations in his figures that require a search of the text (sometimes frustrating) to definitively determine.

*Robert E. Snodgrass. (1905) A Revision of the Mouth-Parts of the Corrodentia and the Mallophaga. Transactions of the American Entomological Society. Vol. 31, No. 4 pp. 297-307

About jjneal

Jonathan Neal is an Associate Professor of Entomology at Purdue University and author of the textbook, Living With Insects (2010). This blog is a forum to communicate about the intersection of insects with people and policy. This is a personal blog. The opinions and materials posted here are those of the author and are in no way connected with those of my employer.
This entry was posted in Art, by jjneal, Taxonomy. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Robert Evans Snodgrass

  1. Pingback: Robert Evans Snodgrass – Entomo Planet

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